Arthur was referred to Imke, one of our rehabilitation officers, by his community support worker at a time of crisis. He had lost his wife the previous year and his guide dog had gone into retirement, leaving him entirely dependent on other people.

“I worked with him, providing daily living skills and mobility training,” remembers Imke. “I liaised with our surveyors in order to get a handrail and step installed to enable him to enjoy his garden again, and they also installed an intercom system to improve his security.”  

Arthur was also referred for counselling which helped him come to terms with his grief at losing his wife. When he felt ready, Imke encouraged Arthur to visit our Llandudno Centre.

“He is a sociable man and I knew he would benefit from the company,” smiles Imke, “he thoroughly enjoyed it there and was able to engage with the sports team - even getting an exercise bike at home.”

A new Blind Veterans UK volunteer coordinator is now working hard to match Arthur up with a suitable volunteer, so he has someone to chat about the football with.

Together, with his community support worker, our team has engaged with external organisations including Royal British Legion’s Poppy Calls service, which has undertaken handyman jobs for Arthur around the house.

“I was also able to be present at an interview with the Department of Work and Pensions to discuss his benefits,” adds Imke. “This resulted in him receiving an additional £80 a month, which helps towards the meal delivery service he has.”

Collaborative working in the community, spearheaded by Blind Veterans UK has enabled Arthur to continue living independently in his own home despite being totally blind.

“He thoroughly enjoyed it there and was able to engage with the sports team - even getting an exercise bike at home.”
Imke Carruthers, Blind Veterans UK rehabilitation officer