Lindy Elliott at Remembrance

Lindy's story

Blind Veterans UK was there for Lindy when her sight deteriorated in 2012

In 1965, and at the age of 19 Lindy joined the Women’s Royal Naval Service(WRENS). She said “As a young woman I wanted a more adventurous life and to travel. In those days, women weren’t expected to do those things.

Being inspired by my father who served in the Navy during the war, I decided to join the WRENS”. During her time with the WRENS Lindy served as a radio operator with the Fleet Air Arm at RNAS Yeovilton in Somerset, before being posted to Singapore where she was part of the first group of WRENS to be sent to the Far East following the Second World War. During her time in Singapore, Lindy served in communications for the Commander of the Far East Fleet.

She said “It was a dramatic but exciting time for me. During this time the conflict in Vietnam was ongoing, as well as the evacuation of Aden”. After her time in Singapore, Lindy returned to Britain to take a commission in the WRENS. She worked for the Ministry of Defence, situated in the Citadel under Horse Guards Parade as a cypher leading WREN. Just three days before going to Greenwich for her commission Lindy was rushed into Royal Hospital Haslar in Hampshire. It was here where Lindy was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, which ended her career. In 2001, Lindy alarmingly noticed blood rushing across her eyes. Her sight continued to deteriorate, so much so that within just four months it had become chronic.

Despite her sight difficulties, Lindy showed incredible determination. She said "It was scary and very difficult to come to terms with but I decided that I wasn't going to let it control my life." In 2012 when Lindy first came through the doors of Blind Veterans UK, being a veteran she was eligible for the charity’s free support.

Lindy received free IT training and equipment from us in order to help her to regain her independence. She said "The training and equipment is very important but for me, it's the companionship that is the best bit.” With her independence back on track, Lindy became involved with our ‘No One Alone’ campaign. Now she regularly travels across the country, talking to clubs and societies about Blind Veterans UK and helps to locate other veterans who are eligible to free lifelong support from us. 

"Realising I was losing my sight was scary and very difficult to come to terms with but I decided that I wasn't going to let it control my life."

She said “It was a dramatic but exciting time for me. During this time the conflict in Vietnam was ongoing, as well as the evacuation of Aden”. After her time in Singapore, Lindy returned to Britain to take a commission in the WRENS. She worked for the Ministry of Defence, situated in the Citadel under Horse Guards Parade as a cypher leading WREN. Just three days before going to Greenwich for her commission Lindy was rushed into Royal Hospital Haslar in Hampshire.

It was here where Lindy was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, which ended her career. In 2001, Lindy alarmingly noticed blood rushing across her eyes. Her sight continued to deteriorate, so much so that within just four months it had become chronic. Despite her sight difficulties, Lindy showed incredible determination. 

"Blind Veterans UK is like another family to me. A family of people who are all together with the same problems and the same support. I don't think I could exist anymore without Blind Veterans UK"

She said "It was scary and very difficult to come to terms with but I decided that I wasn't going to let it control my life." In 2012 when Lindy first came through the doors of Blind Veterans UK, being a veteran she was eligible for the charity’s free support. Lindy received free IT training and equipment from us in order to help her to regain her independence.

She said "The training and equipment is very important but for me, it's the companionship that is the best bit.” With her independence back on track, Lindy became involved with our ‘No One Alone’ campaign. Now she regularly travels across the country, talking to clubs and societies about Blind Veterans UK and helps to locate other veterans who are eligible to free lifelong support from us.